WAVE OF LIGHT

What is a miscarriage?

miscarriage is the loss of a fetus before the 20th week of pregnancy. The medical term for a miscarriage is spontaneous abortion, but “spontaneous” is the key word here because the condition is not an abortion in the common definition of the term.

What is SIDS

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old. SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs.

What is a stillborn

Stillbirth is typically defined as fetal death at or after 20 to 28 weeks of pregnancy (depending on the source). It results in a baby born without signs of life. The term is in contrast to miscarriage, which is an early pregnancy loss, and live birth, where the baby is born alive, even if it dies shortly after.

 


 

An opportunity to join with bereaved parents, families and friends around the globe to commemorate all babies who sadly died too soon. It is a day of remembrance for pregnancy loss and infant death which includes, but is not limited to, miscarriage, stillbirth, SIDS or the death of a newborn.

The simultaneous lighting of candles across the globe symbolises a united wave of light, a powerful image to represent the experience of losing a baby.

To join the global ‘Wave of Light’, simply light a candle at 7pm local time on 15 October and leave it burning for at least one hour – unless you’re me and you’re late but this week is Baby Loss Awareness Week.

 

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I’ve suffered a miscarriage before and it was an isolating, confusing time – looking back I see how things were meant to be and how fortunate I am.

It was a pretty dark time.

Winnie was my calm after a very long storm.

Pregnancy and baby loss is often a taboo subject. You can help to break the silence around baby loss by talking to your friends, family and colleagues about Baby Loss Awareness Week and by joining the conversation on social media using #BLAW2019

 


 

Bliss Campaign

“We want every parent who needs specialist psychological support following pregnancy and baby loss to be able to access services which are:

  • Appropriate to their needs and delivered by specialist staff
  • Easily accessible to every parent who needs it and free of charge
  • Available at a time that is right for parents.

However, our research shows that the provision of these services is patchy at best – and non-existent at worst. Too many people are unable to access the support they need, when they need it. That’s why we’re calling on all UK Governments and service providers to commit to improving the availability and quality of the psychological support on offer.

You can read our findings and find out how to take action on Wednesday 9 October, so watch this space!

How can I get involved this year?

There are plenty of other things to do and ways to get involved this Baby Loss Awareness Week. You might want to:

  • Join the global Wave of Light at 7pm on 15 October. Simply light a candle and leave it burning for at least an hour to remember all babies who have died to soon. You can share a picture of your candle on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using #WaveOfLight
  • Attend an event or commemoration service. Find out what’s happening near you!

For more ways to get involved please visit the Baby Loss Awareness Week website.

 


 

 

For more information click through to Babyloss.Awareness.org.

 

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Miscarriage

 

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KEEP GOING

 

 

Last year I joined in with the company MAM to share awareness.

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